Solar system – Sinia Planeta http://sinia-planeta.com/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 22:56:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sinia-planeta.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50-120x120.png Solar system – Sinia Planeta http://sinia-planeta.com/ 32 32 A mega-comet lurks in our solar system, spewing carbon monoxide • The Register https://sinia-planeta.com/a-mega-comet-lurks-in-our-solar-system-spewing-carbon-monoxide-the-register/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 06:32:00 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/a-mega-comet-lurks-in-our-solar-system-spewing-carbon-monoxide-the-register/ Not only is comet Bernardinelli-Bernstein the largest of its kind known, but it’s also one of the most active and distant comets, likely spewing plumes of gas farther from the Sun than expected. The object, code name C / 2014 UN271 (Bernardinelli-Bernstein) or simply comet BB, was first spotted in 2014. It was provisionally considered […]]]>

Not only is comet Bernardinelli-Bernstein the largest of its kind known, but it’s also one of the most active and distant comets, likely spewing plumes of gas farther from the Sun than expected.

The object, code name C / 2014 UN271 (Bernardinelli-Bernstein) or simply comet BB, was first spotted in 2014. It was provisionally considered a minor planet, which means that it could be an asteroid, a transneptunian object or even a dwarf planet. After researchers working at the Las Cumbres Observatory in California discovered a coma – a hazy halo of gas enveloping the object, which is typically found around comets – it was referred to as a comet.

Measuring 100 km in diameter, comet BB is about 1,000 times the size of the average icy space rock we observe, and has made headlines for being the largest such object known to science.

Digital render of comet BB … Image credit: NOIRLab / NSF / AURA / J. da Silva / spacecraft

It orbits the Sun at a distance beyond Uranus, and its coma has revealed that it is also one of the most active comets. Most comets are inert and push molecules from their surface and form tails of gas and dust when they are close enough to the Sun to be warmed by the star’s rays. The molecules are usually formed from the ice evaporating from its nucleus. Active comets are therefore normally found closer to our star.

Now, a study published this week in The Planetary Science Journal suggests that the mega-comet went into a coma at a surprising 23.8 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun – about 24 times the distance between Earth and our star, or more than 2.2 billion miles.

Scientists believe he was likely active not only at this enormous distance, breathing out gases and possibly other material, but also at distances greater than those previously measured, which is important.

The point at which a comet is activated by the Sun reveals clues to the composition of the rock, as different chemicals activate at certain distances. Not only that, it is unheard of so far for a rock this big to be active this far.

“These observations push the distances of active comets considerably farther than we previously thought,” Tony Farnham, senior author of the article and researcher in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Maryland, said in a statement.

“We’re assuming comet BB was probably active even further away, but we just haven’t seen it before that. What we don’t know yet is if there is an endpoint where we can start to. see these things in a cold store before they become active.

Farnham explained to The register that comet BB is most likely ejecting carbon monoxide molecules.

CO begins to activate first, at very great distances, so we suspect that it is the gas that drives the activity we see in this comet.

“The three main components that produce activity in comets are carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. CO begins to activate first, at very great distances, so we suspect that it is the gas that drives the activity we see in this comet. CO2 needs hotter temperatures to evaporate and activates around 10-12 AU, and the water needs the hottest, activating around 3 AU.

“We should be able to track CO and CO2 activity to confirm that they initiated the activity. Unfortunately, the comet reaches perihelion at about 10 AU, around Saturn’s orbit, so water will never be a big contributor, and it will never get very bright, even if the nucleus is large.

The perihelion being the closest point at which an object orbiting the Sun is closest to the star.

Solar System’s fastest orbiting asteroid spotted, flies closer to the Sun than Mercury

READ MORE

Farnham believes comet BB could help astronomers understand how comets and the solar system form: “We have little data on the start-up processes of how comets become active, and find them at heliocentric distances of larger and larger helps provide data on these processes. Do they light up and become continuously active or do they start and stop for a period of time before fully turning on? “

“The large nucleus also allows us to address questions about comet formation, which ultimately leads to information about the formation of the solar system. These large objects are unusual and can fill gaps in our understanding of how bodies accumulate to produce comets, asteroids and ultimately planets, ”he concluded. ®


Source link

]]>
Curious Kids: What is the coldest planet in the solar system? https://sinia-planeta.com/curious-kids-what-is-the-coldest-planet-in-the-solar-system/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 12:31:04 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/curious-kids-what-is-the-coldest-planet-in-the-solar-system/ This article originally appeared on The conversation. The post contributed the article to Space.com’s Expert voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Brad Gibson, Director of the EA Milne Center for Astrophysics and Head of the Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull What is the coldest planet in the solar system? – Seven-year-old Sejal, Bangalore, India […]]]>

This article originally appeared on The conversation. The post contributed the article to Space.com’s Expert voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

Brad Gibson, Director of the EA Milne Center for Astrophysics and Head of the Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull


Source link

]]>
TRAPPIST-1 solar system not bombarded by space rocks like early Earth, study finds https://sinia-planeta.com/trappist-1-solar-system-not-bombarded-by-space-rocks-like-early-earth-study-finds/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 09:16:33 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/trappist-1-solar-system-not-bombarded-by-space-rocks-like-early-earth-study-finds/ TRAPPIST-1 would be an ordinary star without the scientific interest aroused by its seven planets. Astronomers first spotted the new worlds, of which at least three could be habitable, in 2016. Now, a new study suggests that how the TRAPPISTE-1 the orbit of the planets could reveal clues to their evolution and how often space […]]]>

TRAPPIST-1 would be an ordinary star without the scientific interest aroused by its seven planets.

Astronomers first spotted the new worlds, of which at least three could be habitable, in 2016. Now, a new study suggests that how the TRAPPISTE-1 the orbit of the planets could reveal clues to their evolution and how often space rocks crashed against them during their formative years.



Source link

]]>
The solar system is full of brines https://sinia-planeta.com/the-solar-system-is-full-of-brines/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/the-solar-system-is-full-of-brines/ Ed Rivera-Valentín has spent a lot of time thinking about brines recently. The special ratio of salt to water in the marinade. The special ingredients that can give things an extra boost. I’m referring, of course, to the salty solutions that are found throughout our solar system, on planets and moons and even asteroids. It […]]]>

Ed Rivera-Valentín has spent a lot of time thinking about brines recently. The special ratio of salt to water in the marinade. The special ingredients that can give things an extra boost.

I’m referring, of course, to the salty solutions that are found throughout our solar system, on planets and moons and even asteroids. It wouldn’t be good for a Thanksgiving turkey, but they could be one of the more intriguing substances in finding alien life. Last month, Rivera-Valentín, a planetologist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Texas, and other scientists gathered for BrinesCon, the first of three conferences in the coming years devoted to brines. A little water, a pinch of salt, this is the kind of mixture that, under the right conditions, could give life a chance to exist, Rivera-Valentín told me. “When we find life,” he said, “it will probably be associated with a brine”.

Over the years, NASA has pursued a strategy of “following the water” when searching for alien life, sending spacecraft to search for traces of H2O on celestial bodies. But “you will never find pure liquid water,” said Rivera-Valentín. “What you’re going to find are brines.” So when scientists are looking for water beyond Earth, they are really looking for salt water. This is where interesting things can happen. Life on Earth is believed to have formed in a primordial soup seasoned with salt, and our oceans today are just giant brines – and teeming with life.

While we haven’t found any evidence of life outside of Earth yet, it turns out the rest of the solar system is pretty salty. Spacecraft have discovered frozen brines on the surface of Mars and evidence of liquids that may exist deep underground. The icy moon of Saturn Enceladus has a brackish ocean under its icy crust. NASA’s spacecraft orbiting Saturn even sampled Enceladian brine before when the material escaped from a crack in the ice and was sprayed into space. In addition to the salts, the passing spacecraft detected organic compounds – not evidence of life, but certainly an indication that the underground ocean could potentially harbor some form of it. Europa, another frozen moon around Jupiter, has a brackish ocean that sometimes spits into space as well. And data from spacecraft suggests that even Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt, could have small pockets of brine draining deep inside its interior.

Brines are great natural places to search for life, as salt can do magical things for water. The presence of salt can prevent water from freezing in very cold weather, which is why people salt their driveway before a snowstorm. “The salts allow liquid water to exist further into the solar system, which expands the Goldilocks area in the solar system where life could exist,” Mohit Melwani Daswani, a geochemist and planetologist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. And the longer a brine can remain unfrozen, the more stability the mixture offers to any life form that might choose to inhabit it.

But as with any good recipe, there is a balance, Daswani said. Too little salt and water could have a hard time mixing with the other chemicals in the brine. Too much salt and not enough water to participate in these chemical reactions, and any form of cellular life that may exist will dry out and break down. “There is definitely a sweet spot out there,” he said.

That’s one of the goals of the brine community in astronomy: to determine the conditions under which brines could produce life – the microbial type, which we’re much more likely to detect than the advanced civilization type. We know that microbial life on Earth comfortably exists in strange places. “Most of the time, when we look for life somewhere, even if it is 800 meters under the Antarctic sea ice or buried in a subglacial lake or in a mine, we find life there”, said Jennifer Hanley, planetary scientist at Lowell Observatory in Arizona, told me. For example, in Chile’s Atacama Desert, one of the planet’s best analogues for Mars, the salt in the soil – ordinary old table salt – absorbs moisture from the air on humid days. The water turns into liquid droplets and, together with the salt, produces a tasty brine for bacteria that live in dry land. The process is known as deliquescence, which resembles a chemical reaction or a cooking technique.

Much like space brine, the perfect turkey brine also involves a bit of mystery, says Bill Nolan, supervisor of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, a hotline the poultry company has operated since the 1980s for the most pressing questions of the people. Americans on Thanksgiving Meal. . The process can be tricky. “People have called me and said, ‘I just realized my turkey has been in the brine for two and a half days,’” Nolan told me. “When something is too salty, it’s a little hard to get that salt out. Like planetary scientists who warn that too much salt is bad for life, Nolan says too much salt is bad for flavor.

So don’t over-salt your turkey and don’t over-salt the solar system. Consider adding peppercorns to your turkey brine, as Nolan recommends, or candied ginger, as Hanley did. Perhaps nature has made some interesting additions to Brines Beyond Earth as well, seasoning them with just enough elements for a piece of life to be born.


Source link

]]>
The planetary orbits of our solar system are ultimately chaotic, according to a French astronomer https://sinia-planeta.com/the-planetary-orbits-of-our-solar-system-are-ultimately-chaotic-according-to-a-french-astronomer/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 12:22:19 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/the-planetary-orbits-of-our-solar-system-are-ultimately-chaotic-according-to-a-french-astronomer/ Four planets of the inner solar system (Elements of this image furnished by NASA- earthmap … [+] http://visibleearth.nasa.gov) getty While the term itself immediately conjures up the kind of alchemy at the heart of sci-fi’s best fantasy, celestial mechanics – the digital nuts and bolts of how planetary bodies move, orbit, and rotate over time. […]]]>

While the term itself immediately conjures up the kind of alchemy at the heart of sci-fi’s best fantasy, celestial mechanics – the digital nuts and bolts of how planetary bodies move, orbit, and rotate over time. cosmic – is as old as astronomy itself.

In fact, celestial mechanics is the study of celestial motion; planets and minor bodies; their orbits, their rotation, their inclination and their evolution over time, Jacques Laskar, astronomer at the Paris Observatory, told me recently. And it basically started with the end of Isaac Newton’s 17th birthday.e laws of motion of the century, he said.

Laskar uses both historical and current data to predict the movements of planetary bodies within our solar system. However, with today’s computer technology, celestial mechanics can be both innovative and revealing.

So, on a recent weeknight in Paris, I found Laskar in his fifth-floor office well after 5 p.m. conversing remotely with a colleague via computer in an office crammed with reference books, journals and even a collection of original multi-volume works by the famous French astronomer and celestial mechanic Urbain le Verrier.

“When I first started in celestial mechanics, it was really considered a very dusty subject,” Laskar said. “But I was really fascinated by this subject.” However, at the time, he says, the mainstream astronomical community seemed to have underestimated how celestial mechanics can influence the physics of the solar system.

“But now they understand it’s not,” Laskar said.

We often think of our own inner solar system as a golden loop construction of pure serendipity, with largely circular orbits, and a natural stabilizing satellite for our own planet. And while this is largely true, Laskar’s four decades of calculations reveal that our own inner solar system is not immune to chaotic intangibles on time scales ranging from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of millions of years.

Even though the motions of our planets haven’t changed much in 3.5 billion years, by definition the inner solar system is still chaotic. This means you can’t predict the movements of planets in the past or the future beyond 60 million years, Laskar explains.

This is because in celestial mechanics, the orbital motions of the planets – and even minor bodies like the asteroids Ceres and Vesta – as they move around the sun have a dynamic effect on other planets in the solar system.

“It’s a chaotic system the same way time is chaotic,” Laskar said.

In my book “Distant Wanderers”, I note that if it had not been for the fortuitous formation of our moon due to the collision of an earth impactor the size of Mars about 4 billion years ago, the obliquity (or axial tilt) of our planet would be insanely chaotic. It would vary by up to 60% over a period of 2 million years.

In fact, Laskar and his colleagues have already found that on timescales of millions of years, the obliquity of Mars has deviated between zero and 60%. This is because Mars only has two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos, and lacks the stabilizing influence of an abnormally large natural satellite like our Moon.

As Laskar told me in my book, “The Moon’s fortuitous influence on the Earth’s obliquity means that the likelihood of finding extra-solar planets with stable obliquities in habitable areas is probably less likely than to win the lottery ”.

Without the Moon, the tilt of the Earth would have been chaotic, Laskar says. This means that we are not in a generic situation, he says.

As for the ultimate stability of planetary orbits within our own inner solar system?

In a 2009 article in the journal Nature, Laskar and co-author Mickael Gastineau have run numerical models of some 2,500 orbits using current knowledge of the initial orbital parameters of our solar system. They found that in about one percent of their models, over a period of five billion years, Mercury’s orbit would become so unstable that the tiny planet would either collide with Venus or be engulfed by the Sun.

Is there any evidence of an additional planet in the inner solar system from 100 million years ago, asks Laskar? The one that could have been ejected from our solar system or the one that could have folded inward and been cannibalized by the Sun?

“I’m trying to prove that there was no extra planet 100 to 500 million years ago,” Laskar said. “It’s difficult because you need observations.”

And, of course, you can’t ask dinosaurs for their observations of celestial mechanics, Laskar said with a smile. So I am relying on geological data beyond 60 million years in the past to try to constrain the past evolution of the solar system, he says.

Laskar is using geological sediments here on Earth to search for signatures that reveal that the orbital motions of the planets we see now are roughly the same as they are today.

“I guess I won’t find an additional planet in the past, what I will instead prove is that the solar system was pretty much what it is now,” Laskar said.

By the end of the interview, it was well after dusk and Laskar led me into the main building of the original observatory and into a long, high-ceilinged room now known as the Meridian Room. This is where a longitudinal meridian line has been drawn across the floor of the observatory and the place remains a point of interest for tour groups.

So, in just a few meters, we were back from the present to a time when Newton and the celestial mechanics Verrier and Joseph-Louis Lagrange were desperately trying to model the motions of our own solar system. And in a way, not much has changed. We still struggle to understand the vagaries of how our internal solar system has changed over time.


Source link

]]>
A ninth planet in our solar system may have just been discovered https://sinia-planeta.com/a-ninth-planet-in-our-solar-system-may-have-just-been-discovered/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 11:26:00 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/a-ninth-planet-in-our-solar-system-may-have-just-been-discovered/ Data collected in 1983 shows signs of what a British astronomer believes is possible proof of a ninth planet in our solar system. The news could bring some comfort to people who are still devastated by Pluto’s demotion to dwarf planet status. Michael Rowan-Robinson, a leading astronomer and emeritus professor of astrophysics at Imperial College […]]]>

Data collected in 1983 shows signs of what a British astronomer believes is possible proof of a ninth planet in our solar system. The news could bring some comfort to people who are still devastated by Pluto’s demotion to dwarf planet status.

Michael Rowan-Robinson, a leading astronomer and emeritus professor of astrophysics at Imperial College London, has discovered that data collected by an early space telescope shows a possible candidate for the ninth planet theory. The data was taken from historical observations made by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983. It was the first orbiting observatory to examine the entire night sky in the infrared spectrum.

Possible proof of a ninth planet found in old data

Artist’s impression of the IRAS space telescope in orbit around the Earth. Image source: JPL / NASA

Rowan-Robinson decided to look back at the data from the 10-month IRAS mission to see if anything in the data had not been discovered. The professor paid special attention to objects moving slowly between one observation and another. This allowed him to rule out any rapidly moving bodies, such as comets or asteroids. Rowan-Robinson says the changes in position for the planetary candidates would have been due to parallax, as the Earth rotated around the sun, causing the IRAS to change in angle.

The astronomer has examined hundreds of sources in the data, however, three sightings made in June, July and September 1983 captured most of his interest. Observations suggest the new planet could be three to five times the size of Earth. It could orbit the sun about 225 times the distance from our home planet.

The ongoing search for planet nine

Neptune
The planet Neptune captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. Image source: NASA / ESA / STScI / MH Wong (University of California, Berkeley) / LA Sromovsky / PM Fry (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Unfortunately, Rowan-Robinson admitted in a recent research paper that the observations are not of high quality. This is because the region of the sky in which they were captured is made up of filaments of gas called cirrus clouds. These cloud-like gases make it difficult to read the observations clearly. He also noted that a recent survey of the sky by Pan-STARRS telescopes in Hawaii failed to record the object. This could suggest that the ninth planet he thought he had discovered is not real.

He also recommended that astronomers check the orbits of dwarf planets beyond Pluto. These checks could possibly explain the sightings he witnessed.

“The candidate is in an orbit that is totally incompatible with our predictions for planet nine, and would not be able to gravitationally disturb the distant solar system in the way we have suggested. But, of course, that doesn’t mean it’s not real, ”noted Mike Brown, a planetary scientist, in a report. series of tweets.

“It just means that it would be a chance discovery of something during the search for Planet Nine. Pluto happened the same way. Tombaugh was looking for Lowell’s planet X (which did not exist) and accidentally found Pluto. Pluto. was not the predicted planet X.

Space continues to provide us with new mysteries to explore. Recently, scientists discovered that an asteroid could be a fragment of the moon. For now, however, the ninth planet – if it exists – continues to elude us.



Source link

]]>
Alien worlds contain minerals like nothing in our solar system, scientists say https://sinia-planeta.com/alien-worlds-contain-minerals-like-nothing-in-our-solar-system-scientists-say/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 05:51:32 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/alien-worlds-contain-minerals-like-nothing-in-our-solar-system-scientists-say/ There is a lot we don’t know about planets outside of the solar system. They’re small, dark, and distant, which means we don’t have a lot of detailed information about their makeup. This is especially true for rocky exoplanets, like Earth, Venus, and Mars, the surfaces of which we currently cannot see. There is, however, […]]]>

There is a lot we don’t know about planets outside of the solar system.

They’re small, dark, and distant, which means we don’t have a lot of detailed information about their makeup. This is especially true for rocky exoplanets, like Earth, Venus, and Mars, the surfaces of which we currently cannot see.

There is, however, a way to peer into the bowels of rocky worlds – and it suggests that some of the minerals they are made of bear no resemblance to the minerals in the solar system. These minerals are so foreign, in fact, that scientists have had to invent new terms to classify them.

The method does this by analyzing the atmosphere of white dwarf stars, which can be “polluted” by minerals from planets and asteroids that have fallen into the stars. The study of these destroyed exoplanets is called necroplanetology.

“The polluted white dwarfs reveal greater planetary variety in our solar neighborhood than is currently appreciated, therefore with unique planetary accretion and differentiation paths that have no direct counterparts in our solar system. “, write the researchers in their article.

“These require new rock classification schemes. “

White dwarfs are what happens to a star like the Sun when it reaches the end of its main sequence lifespan, causing its core to collapse into an ultra-dense glowing object of waste heat. Meanwhile, its outer skin stretches across its solar system in the form of a vast bubble of hot gases.

Surprisingly, exoplanets can survive this process – but their orbits can change, become unstable, causing tidal disturbance (this is when the star’s gravitational field separates the exoplanet) and accretion ( when debris from the jagged exoplanet falls on the star).

When this happens, elements of the exoplanets are incorporated into the star, altering the light emitted by the star. Planetologists can then analyze this light, looking for elements that would not normally be found in the atmosphere of a white dwarf, to determine what the rocky bodies were made of. It is the science of necroplanetology.

Geologist Keith Putirka of California State University and astronomer Siyi Xu of the National Science Foundation’s NOIRLab performed such analyzes on 23 white dwarfs, all located within 650 light years of the Sun. For each of these stars, previous observations have shown the presence of elements such as calcium, silicon, magnesium and iron.

Because white dwarfs are so dense, heavier elements like these should not be present in the atmosphere, but attracted inside the star, where they would not be detectable. Their presence suggests a relatively recent accretion of rock material.

Purtika and Xu analyzed the abundance of these elements in the atmospheres of white dwarfs in an attempt to reconstruct the mineral composition of the parent rock bodies. What they found was surprising.

“While some exoplanets that once revolved around polluted white dwarfs appear similar to Earth, most have rock types that are exotic to our solar system,” says Xu. “They don’t have direct counterparts in the solar system.”

Researchers have developed a number of new terms to classify these rocks and their exotic compositions, including quartz pyroxenites, quartz orthopyroxenites, periclastic dunites, periclastic wehrlites, and periclastic clinopyroxenites.

These rocks could tell us a lot about the types of exoplanets they come from and how they have evolved, the researchers say. And this information could also have implications for assessing the habitability of exoplanets.

“Some of the rock types we see in the white dwarf data would dissolve more water than rocks on Earth and could impact the development of the oceans,” Purtika explains.

“Certain types of rock could melt at much lower temperatures and produce a thicker crust than terrestrial rocks, and certain types of rock could be weaker, which could facilitate the development of plate tectonics.”

Additionally, learning more about the compositions of rocky exoplanets via necroplanetology could help us answer some existential questions about our own place in the Universe. For example, we might find that certain regions of the galaxy are more likely to form Earth-like planets than other regions.

“Studies of exoplanets also force us to face still unresolved questions about why Earth is so completely different from its immediate planetary neighbors, and whether such contrasts are typical or inevitable,” the researchers explain.

The research was published in Nature Communication.


Source link

]]>
The solar system is at war in the trailer for the final season of the Expanse https://sinia-planeta.com/the-solar-system-is-at-war-in-the-trailer-for-the-final-season-of-the-expanse/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 17:07:25 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/the-solar-system-is-at-war-in-the-trailer-for-the-final-season-of-the-expanse/ The solar system is at war in the sixth and final season of The extent. Fans of The extent were devastated several years ago when SyFy canceled the beloved series after just three seasons. Thankfully, he got a second life thanks to Amazon Prime Video, coming back stronger than ever with stellar third and fourth […]]]>

The solar system is at war in the sixth and final season of The extent.

Fans of The extent were devastated several years ago when SyFy canceled the beloved series after just three seasons. Thankfully, he got a second life thanks to Amazon Prime Video, coming back stronger than ever with stellar third and fourth seasons. But all good things come to an end, even for the intrepid crew of the Rocinante. Amazon has just released the official trailer for the sixth and final season of The extent, and it promises to be the riskiest season yet.

(Some spoilers for previous seasons below, especially S5.)

As we reported earlier, The extent is based on a series of novels by James SA Corey (the pen name of the writing team Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck), exploring the interplanetary tensions erupting throughout a solar system long colonized by humans (known as the name of Earthlings, Martians and “Belters”). Part mystery, part political thriller, part classic space opera, The extent has earned next to nothing but praise from critics and devoted fans, not only for its gripping storytelling, but also for its use of precise physics.

In the S4 finale, Belter frontman Marco Inaros (Keon Alexander) launched masked asteroids towards Earth, cleverly targeting blind spots in the planet’s defenses. S5 opened with multitudes of humans leaving the solar system in search of new homes and vast fortunes on Earth-like worlds beyond the Alien Ring. The Rocinante the crew split up to pursue their own personal quests.

Amos (Wes Chatham) returned to Earth to face his past and the legacy of the life he fought to leave behind. Naomi (Dominique Tipper) attempted to save her son, Filip (Jasai Chase-Owens), from the toxic influence of his father Marco. Bobbie (Frankie Adams) and Alex (Cas Anvar) faced the collapse of Mars as they hunted down an obscure cabal with ties to terrorists and criminals. Holden (Steven Strait) struggled with the aftermath of his own past with the Protomolecule, the aliens who built it, and the mystery of what killed them. Thresher (Cara Gee), along with a new team, fought to escape who and what she was. And Avasarala (Shohreh Aghdashloo), refusing to be relegated to the background, fought to prevent a terrorist attack unprecedented in history.

Eventually, all of these scenarios started to reconverge. In the S5 final, the Rocinante escaped destruction by the ships of the Free Navy, thanks to Drummer’s intervention. Inaros was not thrilled with Drummer’s betrayal, executing one of his associates in retaliation. In a fine political maneuver, Avasarala was re-elected to the post of Secretary General of the United Nations. Bobbie and Alex managed to save Naomi from her captors, although Alex died in the process. (Case Anvar was excluded from the series after multiple allegations of sexual harassment surfaced.) And in a final twist, an alien superstructure orbiting a world beyond the space ring known as of Laconia suddenly began to flower with the Protomolecule.

This brings us to the sixth and final season. According to the official premise:

This season of The extent resumes with the warring solar system, as Marco Inaros and his Free Navy continue to launch devastating asteroid attacks on Earth and Mars. As the tensions of war and shared losses threaten to pull the crew of the Rocinante aside, Chrisjen Avasarala makes a bold move and sends former Martian sailor Bobbie Draper on a secret mission that could turn the tide. Meanwhile, in the Belt, Drummer and what remains of his family are on the run and hunted down for betraying Marco. And on a distant planet beyond the Rings, a new power begins to rise.

The trailer opens with Avasarala’s husky voice turning philosophical. “We wandered around, broken, desperately trying to keep going by pretending not,” she said. Meanwhile, Marco declares that Ceres will be the capital of the new Belter Nation, “a place all Belters can forever call home.” Avasarala’s spies finally locate Marco’s ships, and she has a plan to bring him down, which apparently involves recruiting the crew of the Rosinante. But Marcos is smart and should fight. Ultimately, Avasarala acknowledges that in the midst of all-out war, “we need something to give us a reason to hope.” It’s still unclear what role Laconia and its flourishing protomolecule will play, but we hope this sixth and final season will live up to the fans.

The sixth season of The extent debuts December 10, 2021 on Prime Video.

Listing image by YouTube / Prime Video


Source link

]]>
British astronomer says he found ninth planet in solar system https://sinia-planeta.com/british-astronomer-says-he-found-ninth-planet-in-solar-system/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 14:31:41 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/british-astronomer-says-he-found-ninth-planet-in-solar-system/ A renowned astronomer from Great Britain, Michael Rowan-Robinson, would have found evidence of the existence of a ninth planet in the solar system. According to their data, the new world is between three and five times the size of Earth, and orbit the Sun about 225 times the distance from our planet. Michael Rowan-Robinson, former […]]]>

A renowned astronomer from Great Britain, Michael Rowan-Robinson, would have found evidence of the existence of a ninth planet in the solar system. According to their data, the new world is between three and five times the size of Earth, and orbit the Sun about 225 times the distance from our planet.

Michael Rowan-Robinson, former president of the Royal Astronomical Society, detected his new world in historical observations made with a space telescope.

Discovery of planet 9

The observation was made thanks to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), which was launched in 1983 as the first orbiting observatory to analyze the entire night sky in the infrared region. For ten months, the mission detected over a quarter of a million infrared sources in the sky, testing its warmth against the cold sky background.

Read also: Astronomers discover gigantic and strange object heading towards the Sun

Professor Rowan-Robinson, 79, when completing his doctorate in astrophysics in 2007, he decided to re-analyze the IRAS data, to see if there was anything to discover in the data. He was particularly interested in finding objects that had moved slowly between an observation. This would exclude more distant sources, such as galaxies, as well as faster-moving bodies, such as comets and asteroids within our solar system.

The main reason for the change in position of a planetary candidate relative to the cosmic background would be due to parallax, because the Earth orbits close to the Sun, which allows IRAS to observe from a different angle.

Planet 9 data

In this way, Rowan-Robinson analyzed hundreds of sources in the data. Responded to three IRAS observations, carried out in June, July and September 1983, and that they had moved slightly during this period.

In a research paper that detailed his research of the Planet 9, the teacher admitted that the observations are not of high quality and that they were made in a region of the sky filled with filaments of galactic gas known as cirrus clouds for their cloudy nature.

He noted that a recent and comprehensive study of the night sky by telescopes Pan-STARRS from Hawaii did not register the object, suggesting it is not real. Planet 9, if it really exists, is in the constellation Cepheus, far removed from the orbits of other planets.

Disclaimer: This article is generated from the feed and is not edited by our team.


Source link

]]>
NASA Releases November Highlights in the Solar System; Here are some tips for looking at the sky https://sinia-planeta.com/nasa-releases-november-highlights-in-the-solar-system-here-are-some-tips-for-looking-at-the-sky/ https://sinia-planeta.com/nasa-releases-november-highlights-in-the-solar-system-here-are-some-tips-for-looking-at-the-sky/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 01:28:25 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/nasa-releases-november-highlights-in-the-solar-system-here-are-some-tips-for-looking-at-the-sky/ A partial lunar eclipse, sunset planets and returning winter stars are just some of the November highlights in the solar system, according to NASA. A NASA science report clarified that from November 6 to 11, the Moon is expected to pass planets, including Saturn, Jupiter and Venus, after sunset in the southwest. Specifically, if one […]]]>

A partial lunar eclipse, sunset planets and returning winter stars are just some of the November highlights in the solar system, according to NASA.

A NASA science report clarified that from November 6 to 11, the Moon is expected to pass planets, including Saturn, Jupiter and Venus, after sunset in the southwest.

Specifically, if one comes out on November 7, it will find the four-day crescent moon at about two degrees of Venus, which is something you can’t miss. And from now until early December, Jupiter and Saturn will move slightly closer to Venus each night.

READ ALSO : Fireball over Brazil could have interstellar origins, third to cross solar system

(Photo: Stephen Rahn of Macon on Wikimedia Commons)
Pleiades star cluster

Partial lunar eclipse

A partial lunar eclipse is about to occur on the night of November 18 and 19, when the Moon slips into Earth’s shadow for several hours.

Weather permitting, the eclipse will be viewed from any location where the Moon appears above the horizon during the eclipse. Depending on the location, it will take place earlier or later in the evening.

The above is a massive swath of Earth that we will see at least part of the eclipse, which includes North and South America, Australia, the Pacific region. It is therefore essential to check the moment of visibility of the eclipse in a particular area.

For observers on the east coast of the United States, the partial eclipse begins a range after 2 a.m., approaching its maximum at 4 a.m.

Partial lunar eclipses might not be as noticeable as full total lunar eclipses, where the Moon is completely covered in Earth’s shadow, although they do occur more often.

“Trojan asteroids”

All this month, if you go to bed late and look east, he will be able to observe that some familiar companions have started to get up late in the evening.

The familiar northern winter sky stars return late, rise late in the evening, and stay high at dawn in the south.

Sky map that shows the sites of many Trojan asteroids that the recently launched NASA spacecraft Lucy is about to visit.

They are faint enough to see without a massive telescope, although their positions in the sky are close to the Pleiades star cluster.

The Pleiades star cluster

The Pleiades star cluster, as depicted in Space.com which directs the constellations Taurus the Taurus and the hunter Orion, followed by Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, all back to accompany observers on the long winter nights in the northern hemisphere.

A funny thing to note about the November Pleiades is that many of the eight asteroids from NASA’s Lucy mission are located in this part of the sky.

The Lucy spacecraft was launched from Space Launch Complex 41 in mid-October 2021, at the Cape Canaveral Space Station in Florida.

This will be the very first space mission to explore such a distinctive group of asteroids, offering new insight into the formation and history of the solar system.

Related information about the NASA highlight in November can be found on the NASA JPL YouTube video below:

RELATED ARTICLE: Could solar explosions trigger northern lights in multiple states during this total lunar eclipse?

Discover more news and information about Space in Science Times.


Source link

]]>
https://sinia-planeta.com/nasa-releases-november-highlights-in-the-solar-system-here-are-some-tips-for-looking-at-the-sky/feed/ 0