solar system – Sinia Planeta http://sinia-planeta.com/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 05:24:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sinia-planeta.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50-120x120.png solar system – Sinia Planeta http://sinia-planeta.com/ 32 32 Lookout to resume astronomy night, reopen visitor center https://sinia-planeta.com/lookout-to-resume-astronomy-night-reopen-visitor-center/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 03:56:15 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/lookout-to-resume-astronomy-night-reopen-visitor-center/ Cape Lookout Lighthouse under the night sky. Photo: Crystal Coast Stargazers/Alex Gu Cape Lookout National Seashore is gearing up for the season by resuming a monthly outdoor stargazing event and opening its visitor center in Beaufort on April 1. Neither is offered during the winter months. The next monthly National Coastal Astronomy Night at 7:30 […]]]>
Cape Lookout Lighthouse under the night sky. Photo: Crystal Coast Stargazers/Alex Gu

Cape Lookout National Seashore is gearing up for the season by resuming a monthly outdoor stargazing event and opening its visitor center in Beaufort on April 1. Neither is offered during the winter months.

The next monthly National Coastal Astronomy Night at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 26 at the Harkers Island Visitor Center.

During Astronomy Night, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Solar System Ambassador Brandon Porter will introduce attendees to celestial objects in the night sky that can be observed with the naked eye and with a telescope.

After the presentation, park staff and astronomers from the Crystal Coast Stargazers, a NASA Night Sky Network astronomy club, will host a Star Party to view the moon and other astronomical objects above the Southern Outer Banks at through a telescope.

The organizers recommend that participants check the weather and dress accordingly, bring lawn chairs or blankets, water, snacks, insect repellent and a flashlight with a red filter which helps to maintain everyone’s night vision.

The Beaufort Visitor Information Center is located at 701 Front Street in the City Hall building. Center hours will be 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily after reopening on April 1. Inside the center there are exhibits on the ecology and history of the southern Outer Banks.

The Visitor Center is opposite the Island Express Ferry Service wharf, which is the authorized concessionaire for passenger service to Shackleford Banks. Call the ferry at 252-728-7433 or visit islandexpressferryservice.com for details.

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Favorite Planet Poll – Smithers Interior News https://sinia-planeta.com/favorite-planet-poll-smithers-interior-news/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 19:58:00 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/favorite-planet-poll-smithers-interior-news/ The seven planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system orbit a dim red dwarf star. MUST CREDIT: Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech Favorite planet poll What is your favorite planet in our solar system? Our solar system is made up of one star – the Sun – eight planets, […]]]>


The seven planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system orbit a dim red dwarf star. MUST CREDIT: Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Favorite planet poll

What is your favorite planet in our solar system?




Our solar system is made up of one star – the Sun – eight planets, 146 moons, a bunch of comets, asteroids and space rocks, ice, and several dwarf planets, like Pluto.

The eight planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Mercury is closest to the Sun. Neptune is the farthest. Pluto was kicked out of the “planet” designation years ago, instead classed as a dwarf planet, though some refuse to acknowledge the change.

According to Wikipedia, “the solar system is the gravitational system of the Sun and the objects that orbit it”.

Of the bodies that orbit directly around the Sun, the largest are the four gas and ice giants and the four terrestrial planets, followed by an unknown number of dwarf planets and countless smaller solar system bodies.

Of the bodies that orbit the Sun indirectly – the natural satellites – two are larger than Mercury, the smallest terrestrial planet, and one is almost as large.














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Meteor-hunting drones could uncover mysteries of the solar system https://sinia-planeta.com/meteor-hunting-drones-could-uncover-mysteries-of-the-solar-system/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 13:50:01 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/meteor-hunting-drones-could-uncover-mysteries-of-the-solar-system/ Researchers have used drones and artificial intelligence (AI) to locate a freshly fallen meteorite in the vast Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia. The new method of locating meteorites developed by a team at Curtin University could dramatically increase the number of space rocks that can be tracked and collected, especially if they are observed as […]]]>

Researchers have used drones and artificial intelligence (AI) to locate a freshly fallen meteorite in the vast Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia.

The new method of locating meteorites developed by a team at Curtin University could dramatically increase the number of space rocks that can be tracked and collected, especially if they are observed as they plunge through the atmosphere.

Since many of these rocks come from asteroids, untouched material left over from the formation of the solar system more than 4.6 billion years ago, studying them could reveal the building blocks of planets like ours.

Studying meteorites can also reveal the age and composition of different planetary building blocks, the temperatures reached on the surface and inside asteroids, and the degree to which materials have been weathered by impacts in the past. , according to NASA.

Graduate student Seamus Anderson of the Curtin Center for Space Science and Technology (CSST) was the principal investigator of the project, which is the first to use a drone to collect images of a landscape, then the AI ​​to digitize these images.

He said in a university press release: “A drone equipped with a camera flies over and collects images of the drop zone, which are transferred to our field computer where an algorithm scans each image for meteorites and characteristics that resemble them.

“Although our algorithm was ‘trained’ on data collected from previous searches for meteorites, we brought previously recovered meteorites with us and imaged them on the ground at the fall site, to create local data with which to further train the algorithm.”

The team’s research is published in the ArXiv online paper repository.

Anderson said meteor searches typically involve a group of people covering large areas of predicted impact on foot. This new method requires only about one-tenth the amount of labor and time.

While most space rocks that enter Earth’s atmosphere shatter while traveling at tens of thousands of miles per hour, NASA estimates that about 5% of these objects reach the ground, with sizes ranging from a pebble in a fist.

Each year, it is estimated that approximately 500 meteorites survive this journey through the Earth’s atmosphere and strike the Earth’s surface. Less than 2% of them are recovered.

Often appearing like a typical Earth rock, but with a burnt or shiny exterior, meteorites can often be difficult to distinguish. And while it’s easier on the sandy bottoms of deserts, the vastness of these regions and the inhospitable environments still make such searches grueling.

Anderson said the new method also has a much higher likely success rate. The team located and recovered the meteorite within four days of being on site at Kybo Station, a farm in Western Australia.

The SSTC researcher said that in addition to increasing our understanding of the solar system, studying meteorites is useful for other reasons: “Meteorites often contain a higher concentration of rare and valuable elements such as cobalt, which is crucial for the construction of modern batteries.

“Furthermore, by gaining a better understanding of how extraterrestrial materials are distributed throughout the solar system, we could one day mine asteroids for valuable resources, instead of searching for finite amounts on Earth and perhaps be harming valuable ecosystems in treating it.”

And beyond the search for meteorites, the system imagined and tested by the team could have many other uses. “Other potential applications for our new approach using drones and artificial intelligence include wildlife management and conservation, as our model could be easily retrained to detect objects other than meteorites, such as plants and animals,” he said.

A file image shows a meteorite passing through the Earth’s atmosphere at thousands of kilometers per hour. Australian researchers have used a powerful combination of AI and drones to search for space rocks, a method that could increase our knowledge of the building blocks of the solar system.
Bjorn Bakstad/GETTY
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DIAS appeals to longford astronomy and photography enthusiasts https://sinia-planeta.com/dias-appeals-to-longford-astronomy-and-photography-enthusiasts/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 12:50:53 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/dias-appeals-to-longford-astronomy-and-photography-enthusiasts/ The Dublin Institute for Advanced Study (DIAS) ‘Reach for the Stars’ astrophotography competition is back for its second year and invites people in Longford interested in photography and astronomy to submit their images. The competition, which is now open for entries, seeks the best astronomical photographs taken in Ireland between April 1, 2021 and April […]]]>

The Dublin Institute for Advanced Study (DIAS) ‘Reach for the Stars’ astrophotography competition is back for its second year and invites people in Longford interested in photography and astronomy to submit their images.

The competition, which is now open for entries, seeks the best astronomical photographs taken in Ireland between April 1, 2021 and April 30, 2022. It calls for entries in two separate categories:

Out of this World: Images depicting scenes/features or items of astronomical interest. For example, images from deep space or images from the solar system.
Back to Earth: Astro-landscape images that depict a feature or item of astronomical interest and capture elements such as nature, cityscapes, buildings or monuments, land or water.

Last year’s winner was Josh Mathews of Shanbolard, Moyard, Co. Galway. His image “To the Waters and the Wild” depicted the night sky above Crocnaraw on the Connemara coast in County Galway.

Launching the competition, Dr. Eucharia Meehan, CEO and Registrar of DIAS, said, “DIAS is delighted to launch the 2022 Reach for the Stars competition. Following the huge success of last year’s competition, we are excited to see what entries will be submitted this year, what creativity people bring and what images they have captured.

“DIAS has a rich heritage and expertise in astronomy and it is fantastic to be able to showcase this, while capturing the imagination and creativity of the public through the wonders of space.

“Last year we received entries from people in Longford and across the country, and this year we hope to see even more. The competition is open to all, whether seasoned professionals or keen amateurs of We just asked them to carefully follow the contest guidelines when submitting to ensure their images are eligible.

Also commenting, Professor Peter Gallagher, Head of Astrophysics at DIAS and Jury Member, said: “As Jury members, we were blown away by the submissions to the competition last year. Images that captured very complex astronomical features and others that perfectly captured the night sky against the beautiful Irish landscape – we had such a range of entries making our job as judges very difficult.

“As part of the competition, it was great to have the shortlisted entries printed for our outdoor exhibition at DIAS last year. Seeing them in large format really brings them to life and we hope to do the same with the shortlisted entries. of this year.

“This year DIAS marks the 75th anniversary of the School of Cosmic Physics and we will be launching a full program of events later in the month. As part of these celebrations, we will award a special prize to a photograph entered in the competition that illustrates the work of one or more areas of research carried out at the School. These research areas include everything from solar and stellar physics and space weather to planetary science and star formation.

“We call on people to be creative. Whether you have professional equipment or just a smartphone, the competition is open to everyone over the age of 18. We can’t wait to see what astronomical events inspired people this year and what they captured.

Contest details

Entries in the “Reach for the Stars” competition will be judged by Brenda Fitzsimons, Photo Editor, The Irish Times; John Flannery, Vice President, Irish Astronomical Society; Peter Gallagher, Senior Professor and Head of Astronomy and Astrophysics at DIAS and Niamh Breathnach, Account Manager, Alice PR & Events.

Entrants may submit up to two images per category to the contest. The registration deadline is 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 30.

All competition entries will be reviewed by a screening committee to ensure they meet the eligibility criteria. The shortlisted images in each category will then be submitted for jury review and online public voting.

Package

The winning photographers in the two main categories, selected by the jury, will receive a prize package including:

Publication of their images on the DIAS and Irish Times websites;
A VIP tour of the DIAS Dunsink Observatory – with the chance to look through Ireland’s largest refractor telescope.
A pass for up to four people to ‘Race to Space’, a fully immersive escape experience, hosted at the DIAS Dunsink Observatory.
€500 voucher for photographic/telescopic equipment; and
A 12-month Premium Digital subscription to The Irish Times.

Two finalists from each category will also be selected by the jury and will each receive a €200 voucher for photographic/telescopic equipment. The winner of the People’s Choice category, elected by the public, will also receive a voucher worth €150 for photographic/telescopic equipment.

DIAS intends that the winning and highly commended images will also be included in an exhibition at DIAS in 2022. Additionally, all shortlisted images will be included in an online exhibition – for public voting purposes – on the website of DIAS, www. dias.ie.

The DIAS ‘Reach for the Stars’ contest is organized in partnership with The Irish Times and is sponsored by Alice PR & Events. The Irish Astronomical Society supports the initiative.

Further information, including competition guidelines and entry form, is available at www.reachforthestars.ie.

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Meteorites That Helped Form Earth Came From The Outer Solar System: Study | The Weather Channel – Articles from The Weather Channel https://sinia-planeta.com/meteorites-that-helped-form-earth-came-from-the-outer-solar-system-study-the-weather-channel-articles-from-the-weather-channel/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 11:30:53 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/meteorites-that-helped-form-earth-came-from-the-outer-solar-system-study-the-weather-channel-articles-from-the-weather-channel/ Representative image. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) The materials that formed Earth may have been developed far back in the early solar system and later brought in during the solar system’s turbulent history, a study suggests. Earth is thought to have formed partly from carbonaceous meteorites, which are thought to have originated from asteroids in the outer main belt. […]]]>

Representative image.

(NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The materials that formed Earth may have been developed far back in the early solar system and later brought in during the solar system’s turbulent history, a study suggests.

Earth is thought to have formed partly from carbonaceous meteorites, which are thought to have originated from asteroids in the outer main belt.

The new study is led by researchers from the Tokyo Institute of Technology whose findings were published in the journal AGU advances.

The study indicates that these asteroid materials may have formed far away in the early solar system and then been transported into the inner solar system by chaotic mixing processes.

The results suggest that surface minerals found on outer main belt asteroids, particularly ammonia (NH3)-containing clays, form from raw materials containing NH3 and carbon dioxide ice ( CO2) which are only stable at very low temperatures and under water. rich conditions.

Based on these results, the study proposes that outer main belt asteroids formed in distant orbits and differentiated to form different minerals in water-rich mantle and rock-dominated cores.

To understand the source of the discrepancies in the measured spectra of carbonaceous meteorites and asteroids, using computer simulations, the team modeled the chemical evolution of several plausible primitive mixtures designed to simulate primitive asteroid materials. They then used these computer models to produce simulated reflectance spectra to compare with those obtained by telescope.

Their models indicated that to match asteroid spectra, the starting material had to contain a significant amount of water and ammonia, a relatively small amount of carbon dioxide (CO2), and react at temperatures below 70°C. vs. This indicates that the asteroids formed much further than their current locations in the early solar system.

If true, this study suggests that the formation of the Earth and its unique properties resulted from particular aspects of the formation of the solar system.

“Whether the formation of our solar system is a typical result remains to be determined, but many measurements suggest that we will soon be able to put our cosmic history into context,” said lead author Hiroyuki Kurokawa of the Earth-Life Science Institute ( ELSI) of the Institute.

There will be several opportunities to test this model, for example, this study provides predictions on what analysis of samples returned by Hayabusa 2 will find. Hayabusa is the Japanese space agency JAXA’s asteroid sample return mission.

This distant origin of asteroids, if correct, predicts that there will be ammonia salts and minerals in samples returned by Hayabusa 2. Further verification of this model will be provided by analyzes of materials returned by the mission. NASA’s OSIRIS-Rex.

**

The above article was published by a news agency with minimal changes to the title and text.

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Meteorites That Helped Form Earth May Have Formed In The Outer Solar System, Study Suggests https://sinia-planeta.com/meteorites-that-helped-form-earth-may-have-formed-in-the-outer-solar-system-study-suggests/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 10:55:43 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/meteorites-that-helped-form-earth-may-have-formed-in-the-outer-solar-system-study-suggests/ Tokyo: A new study by researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) has suggested that these asteroid materials could have formed very far away in the early solar system and then been transported around the system. internal solar by chaotic mixing processes. The study was published in the journal “AGU Advances.’ […]]]>

Tokyo: A new study by researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) has suggested that these asteroid materials could have formed very far away in the early solar system and then been transported around the system. internal solar by chaotic mixing processes.

The study was published in the journal “AGU Advances.’

Our solar system is thought to have formed from a cloud of gas and dust, called the solar nebula, which began gravitationally condensing around 4.6 billion years ago. As this cloud contracted, it began to spin and form into a spinning disk around the highest gravity mass at its center, which would become our Sun.

Our solar system inherited all of its chemical composition from an earlier star or stars that exploded as supernovae. Our Sun picked up a general sample of this material as it formed, but the residual material in the disk began to migrate due to its propensity to freeze at a given temperature. As the Sun became dense enough to initiate nuclear fusion reactions and become a star, it picked up a general sample of this material during its formation, but the remnants in the disk formed solid material to form planetary bodies based on its propensity to freeze at any given time. Temperature.

When the Sun irradiated the surrounding disk, it created a heat gradient in the early solar system. For this reason, the inner planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are mostly made of rock (mainly composed of heavier elements, such as iron, magnesium, and silicon), while the outer planets are made of rock. largely composed of lighter elements, in particular hydrogen, helium. , carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

Earth is thought to have formed partly from carbonaceous meteorites, which are thought to have originated from asteroids in the outer main belt. Telescopic observations of outer main belt asteroids reveal a common feature of 3.1mm reflectance that suggests their outer layers host either water ice or ammonia clays, or both, which are only stable at very low temperatures.

Interestingly, although several lines of evidence suggest that carbonaceous meteorites are derived from such asteroids, meteorites recovered from Earth generally lack this feature. The asteroid belt therefore raises many questions for astronomers and planetary scientists.

In this study, a combination of asteroid observations using the Japanese AKARI space telescope and theoretical modeling of chemical reactions in asteroids suggests that surface minerals present on outer main belt asteroids, in particular clays containing ammonia (NH3), form from raw materials containing Ice NH3 and CO2 which are only stable at very low temperatures and under water-rich conditions.

Based on these results, this new study proposed that outer main-belt asteroids form in distant orbits and differentiate to form different minerals in water-rich mantles and rock-dominated cores.

To understand the source of the discrepancies in the measured spectra of carbonaceous meteorites and asteroids, using computer simulations, the team modeled the chemical evolution of several plausible primitive mixtures designed to simulate primitive asteroid materials. They then used these computer models to produce simulated reflectance spectra to compare with those obtained by telescope.

Their models indicated that to match the asteroid spectra, the starting material had to contain a significant amount of water and ammonia, a relatively low abundance of CO2, and react at temperatures below 70, suggesting that the asteroids would are formed much further than their current presence. locations in the early solar system. In contrast, the absence of the 3.1 mm feature in meteorites can be attributed to a possibly deeper reaction inside the asteroids where temperatures reached higher values. Thus, recovered meteorites can sample deeper parts of asteroids.

If true, this study suggests that the formation of the Earth and its unique properties resulted from particular aspects of the formation of the solar system. There will be several opportunities to test this model, for example, this study provides predictions on what analysis of samples returned by Hayabusa 2 will find. This distant origin of asteroids, if correct, predicts that there will be ammonia salts and minerals in samples returned by Hayabusa 2. Further verification of this model will be provided by analyzes of materials returned by the mission. NASA’s OSIRIS-Rex.

This study also investigated whether the physical and chemical conditions of outer main belt asteroids should be able to form the observed minerals. The proposed cold and distant origin of asteroids suggests that there should be a significant similarity between asteroids and comets and raises questions about how each of these body types formed.

This study suggested that the materials that formed the Earth may have formed very far away in the early solar system, then were introduced during the solar system’s particularly turbulent early days. Recent observations of protoplanetary disks by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have found numerous ring structures, which are thought to be direct observations of planetesimal formation.

As lead author Hiroyuki Kurokawa summed up the work, “Whether the formation of our solar system is a typical outcome remains to be determined, but many measurements suggest that we may soon be able to put our cosmic history into context.”

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Meteorites That Helped Form Earth May Have Formed In The Outer Solar System https://sinia-planeta.com/meteorites-that-helped-form-earth-may-have-formed-in-the-outer-solar-system/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 05:02:00 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/meteorites-that-helped-form-earth-may-have-formed-in-the-outer-solar-system/ Our solar system is believed to have formed from a cloud of gas and dust, the so-called solar nebula, which began gravitationally condensing around 4.6 billion years ago. As this cloud contracted, it began to spin and form into a spinning disk around the highest gravity mass at its center, which would become our Sun. […]]]>

Our solar system is believed to have formed from a cloud of gas and dust, the so-called solar nebula, which began gravitationally condensing around 4.6 billion years ago. As this cloud contracted, it began to spin and form into a spinning disk around the highest gravity mass at its center, which would become our Sun. Our solar system inherited all of its chemical composition from an earlier star or stars that exploded as supernovae. Our Sun picked up a general sample of this material as it formed, but the residual material in the disk began to migrate due to its propensity to freeze at a given temperature. As the Sun became dense enough to initiate nuclear fusion reactions and become a star, it picked up a general sample of this material during its formation, but the remnants in the disk formed solid material to form planetary bodies based on its propensity to freeze at any given time. Temperature. When the Sun irradiated the surrounding disk, it created a heat gradient in the early solar system. For this reason, the inner planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are mostly made of rock (mainly composed of heavier elements, such as iron, magnesium, and silicon), while the outer planets are made of rock. largely composed of lighter elements, in particular hydrogen, helium. , carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

Earth is thought to have formed partly from carbonaceous meteorites, which are thought to have originated from asteroids in the outer main belt. Telescopic observations of outer main-belt asteroids reveal a common reflectance feature of 3.1 μm that suggests that their outer layers host either water ices or ammonia clays, or both, which are stable only at very low temperatures. Interestingly, although several lines of evidence suggest that carbonaceous meteorites are derived from such asteroids, meteorites recovered from Earth generally lack this feature. The asteroid belt thus raises many questions for astronomers and planetary scientists.

A new study by researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) suggests that these asteroid materials may have formed very far away in the early solar system and then been transported into the inner solar system by chaotic mixing processes. In this study, a combination of asteroid observations using the Japanese AKARI space telescope and theoretical modeling of chemical reactions in asteroids suggests that surface minerals present on outer main belt asteroids, in especially ammonia (NH3)-bearing clays, formed from raw materials containing NH3 and co2 ice that are only stable at very low temperatures and in water-rich conditions. Based on these findings, this new study proposes that outer main belt asteroids formed in distant orbits and differentiated to form different minerals in water-rich mantle and rock-dominated cores.

To understand the source of the discrepancies in the measured spectra of carbonaceous meteorites and asteroids, using computer simulations, the team modeled the chemical evolution of several plausible primitive mixtures designed to simulate primitive asteroid materials. They then used these computer models to produce simulated reflectance spectra to compare with those obtained by telescope.

Their models indicated that to match the asteroid spectra, the starting material had to contain a significant amount of water and ammonia, a relatively low abundance of CO2, and react to temperatures below 70℃, suggesting that the asteroids formed far beyond their current locations in the early solar system. In contrast, the absence of the 3.1 mm feature in meteorites can be attributed to a possibly deeper reaction inside the asteroids where temperatures reached higher values. Thus, recovered meteorites can sample deeper parts of asteroids.

If true, this study suggests that the formation of the Earth and its unique properties resulted from particular aspects of the formation of the solar system. There will be several opportunities to test this model, for example, this study provides predictions on what analysis of samples returned by Hayabusa 2 will find. This distant origin of asteroids, if correct, predicts that there will be ammonia salts and minerals in samples returned by Hayabusa 2. Further verification of this model will be provided by analyzes of materials returned by the mission. NASA’s OSIRIS-Rex.

This study also investigated whether the physical and chemical conditions of outer main belt asteroids should be able to form the observed minerals. The proposed cold and distant origin of asteroids suggests that there should be a significant similarity between asteroids and comets and raises questions about how each of these body types formed.

This study suggests that the materials that formed the Earth may have formed very far away in the early solar system, then were introduced during the solar system’s particularly turbulent early days. Recent observations of protoplanetary disks by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have found numerous ring structures, which are thought to be direct observations of planetesimal formation. As lead author Hiroyuki Kurokawa summarizes the work, “Whether the formation of our solar system is a typical outcome remains to be determined, but many measurements suggest that we may soon be able to put our cosmic history into context.”

Reference

H. Kurokawa1*, T. Shibuya2Y.Sekine1BL Ehlmann3.4F.Usui5.6S.Kikuchi2and Mr. Yoda1.7Distant Formation and Differentiation of Outer Main Belt Asteroids and Carbonaceous Chondrite Parent Bodies, AGU Advances, DOI: 10.1029/2021AV000568

  1. Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan
  2. Super-cutting-edge Grand and Advanced Research Program (SUGAR), Institute for Extra-cutting-edge Science and Technology Avant-garde Research (X-star), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokosuka, Japan
  3. Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
  4. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA
  5. Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Japan
  6. Center for Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan
  7. Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

More information

Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) is at the forefront of research and higher education as the leading science and technology university in Japan. Tokyo Tech researchers excel in fields ranging from materials science to biology, computer science and physics. Founded in 1881, Tokyo Tech enrolls more than 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students each year, who become scientific leaders and some of the most sought-after engineers in the industry. Embodying the Japanese philosophy of “monotsukuri”, meaning “technical ingenuity and innovation”, the Tokyo Tech community strives to contribute to society through high-impact research.

The Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) is one of Japan’s ambitious international research centers, whose goal is to achieve progress in broadly interdisciplinary fields of science by inviting the world’s greatest minds to come to Japan. and to collaborate on the most ambitious scientific projects. problems. ELSI’s main goal is to address the origin and co-evolution of Earth and life.

The World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI) was launched in 2007 by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) to help build globally visible research centers in Japan. These institutes promote high research standards and exceptional research environments that attract frontline researchers from around the world. These centers are highly autonomous, allowing them to revolutionize conventional ways of operating and administering research in Japan.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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Call for astronomy photographers after successful Offaly competition last year https://sinia-planeta.com/call-for-astronomy-photographers-after-successful-offaly-competition-last-year/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 10:45:10 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/call-for-astronomy-photographers-after-successful-offaly-competition-last-year/ The Dublin Institute for Advanced Study (DIAS) ‘Reach for the Stars’ astrophotography competition is back for its second year and invites Offaly people interested in photography and astronomy to submit their images . The competition, which is now open for entries, seeks the best astrophotographs taken in Ireland during the period 1 April 2021 to […]]]>

The Dublin Institute for Advanced Study (DIAS) ‘Reach for the Stars’ astrophotography competition is back for its second year and invites Offaly people interested in photography and astronomy to submit their images .

The competition, which is now open for entries, seeks the best astrophotographs taken in Ireland during the period 1 April 2021 to 30 April 2022. It invites entries in two separate categories:

Out of this world: Images depicting scenes/features or items of astronomical interest. For example, images from deep space or images from the solar system.

Back on Earth: Astro-landscape images that depict a feature or item of astronomical interest and capture elements such as nature, cityscapes, buildings or monuments, land or water.

Offaly man Tom O’Hanlon of Tullamore, Co. Offaly was announced as a finalist in the competition last year. His ‘North Star Jesuit House’ image is a series of nailed images, taking the North Star, which shows the rotation of the Earth, captured at Tullybeg House – the former Jesuit boarding school – in Rahan, Co. Offaly.

Launching the competition, Dr. Eucharia Meehan, CEO and Registrar of DIAS, said, “DIAS is delighted to launch the 2022 Reach for the Stars competition. Following the huge success of last year’s competition, we are excited to see what entries will be submitted this year, what creativity people bring and what images they have captured.

“DIAS has a rich heritage and expertise in astronomy and it is fantastic to be able to showcase this, while capturing the imagination and creativity of the public through the wonders of space.

“Last year we received entries from people in Offaly and across the country, and this year we hope to see even more. We just asked them to carefully follow the contest guidelines when submitting to ensure their images are eligible.

Also commenting, Professor Peter Gallagher, Head of Astrophysics at DIAS and Jury Member, said: “As Jury members, we were blown away by the submissions to the competition last year. Images that captured very complex astronomical features and others that perfectly captured the night sky against the beautiful Irish landscape – we had such a range of entries making our job as judges very difficult.

“As part of the competition, it was great to have the shortlisted entries printed for our outdoor exhibition at DIAS last year. Seeing them in large format really brings them to life and we hope to do the same with the shortlisted entries. of this year.

“This year DIAS marks the 75th anniversary of the School of Cosmic Physics and we will be launching a full program of events later in the month. As part of these celebrations, we will award a special prize to a photograph entered in the competition that illustrates the work of one or more areas of research carried out at the School. These research areas include everything from solar and stellar physics and space weather to planetary science and star formation.

“We call on people to be creative. Whether you have professional equipment or simply a smartphone, the competition is open to everyone over the age of 18. We can’t wait to see what astronomical events inspired people this year and what they captured.

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ESO’s new tech telescope, TESS, helps discover an Earth-like planet in the habitable zone of a dead star https://sinia-planeta.com/esos-new-tech-telescope-tess-helps-discover-an-earth-like-planet-in-the-habitable-zone-of-a-dead-star/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 05:50:01 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/esos-new-tech-telescope-tess-helps-discover-an-earth-like-planet-in-the-habitable-zone-of-a-dead-star/ The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have recently glimpsed the distant future of Earth. NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) recently discovered potential signs of a rocky exoplanet orbiting a white dwarf star called WD 1054-226, per Space.com. The white dwarf star and the exoplanet that orbits it […]]]>

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have recently glimpsed the distant future of Earth.

NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) recently discovered potential signs of a rocky exoplanet orbiting a white dwarf star called WD 1054-226, per Space.com.

The white dwarf star and the exoplanet that orbits it are located 117 light-years from Earth in the constellation Crater, according to the News 9 Live report.

What did TESS see?

NASA’s TESS saw planetary debris and moon-sized objects in the habitable zone of WD 1054-226, possible clues that a rocky Earth-sized exoplanet could be 1.6 million miles away. miles from WD 1054-226, a distance that is within the habitable zone of the white dwarf star’s zone.

The habitable zone, also known as the “Goldilocks zone”, is generally defined as where liquid water can exist on the surface of a rocky planet.

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The researchers also noticed “sharp light dips,” or times when a star’s light gradually rises and falls over a significant duration. They did this using ESO’s new technology 3.5 meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile.

The light troughs from WD1054-226 correspond to 65 “equidistant” clouds of planetary debris that orbit the star every 25 hours, the scientists noted. As such, the regular distribution of space junk suggests that an Earth-sized terrestrial planet could hold everything in place.

Only one other planet has been discovered orbiting a white dwarf. However, this planet turned out to be a gas giant, a planet similar to Jupiter of our solar system, and far from the habitable zone of the white dwarf star.

A white dwarf star is the last stage of stars eight times more massive than the Sun in our solar system after they become a red giant. The transformation of a star into a white dwarf occurs when a star runs out of hydrogen to fuel itself. Scientists predict that the Sun will undergo this transformation in about five billion years.

What this means for science

The researchers were initially surprised by their findings. Astrophysicist Jay Farihi of University College London said the possibility of a major planet in the habitable zone is “exciting and also unexpected; we weren’t looking for that,” according to the Royal Astronomical Society website.

If the researchers were right, the discovery of the exoplanet would be a breakthrough for white dwarf science.

However, Prof Farihi cautioned about the procedures needed to confirm the presence of the exoplanet as it cannot be directly observed on Earth.

“We cannot observe the planet directly, so confirmation can come by comparing computer models with other observations of the star and orbiting debris,” Prof Farihi said.

Prof Farihi is the lead author of the study that found hints of a rocky exoplanet around WD 1054-226, which is published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Related article: NASA’s Perseverance rover successfully collects its 7th sample

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An Earth-like planet could be orbiting in the ‘habitable zone’ of a dead star https://sinia-planeta.com/an-earth-like-planet-could-be-orbiting-in-the-habitable-zone-of-a-dead-star/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 15:00:57 +0000 https://sinia-planeta.com/an-earth-like-planet-could-be-orbiting-in-the-habitable-zone-of-a-dead-star/ Planetary debris, including some moon-sized objects, may hint at a rocky exoplanet in a stellar zombie’s habitable zone, according to a new study. The star in question is a white dwarf called WD1054-226, a cooling remnant of a star that has used up all the fuel in its core. If an exoplanet is confirmed in […]]]>

Planetary debris, including some moon-sized objects, may hint at a rocky exoplanet in a stellar zombie’s habitable zone, according to a new study.

The star in question is a white dwarf called WD1054-226, a cooling remnant of a star that has used up all the fuel in its core. If an exoplanet is confirmed in the system, it would be a breakthrough for white dwarf science, the researchers noted in a statement. Only one other planet has been discovered to date orbiting a white dwarf. This planet, however, is a gas giant, a planet similar to Jupiter, and not near the habitable zone (generally defined as where liquid water can exist on the surface of a rocky planet).

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